GenTraveling in the UK

northumberland

Hello GenTravelers! Question for y’all:  What is the largest group of GenTravelers you’ve been traveling with? Last year I went GenTraveling with my mom, five sisters, two brothers-in-law and my husband (10 of us) and I thought that was a good sized group!  BUT, today’s featured story is about 46 – YES, 46! cousins from the U.S. who traveled back to their ancestral UK home of Northumberland!

In September of 2017, 46 American descendants of the Ogle family went GenTraveling.  All were members of the Ogle/Ogles Family Association of America (OOFA). While they were there, they presented Northumberland College with a wooden plaque that honored the Ogle family and helped restore a historic pond that was originally part of their ancestors’ estate. The pond was renamed Ogle Pond. You can check out their Association’s website which has more information and photos HERE.

Are you a member of a family association? Perhaps you could suggest a massive GenTraveling trip to your ancestral home!

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So, are you planning your GenTraveling yet? Where do you plan to go? Be sure to share your GenTraveling Bucket list on our Bucket List Page.  GenTraveling: It’s the Real Deal Thrill!

{photo credit: wikipedia}

GenTraveling – Friday Finds

fridayfinds

Hello! I have some Fabulous Friday Finds to share with you!

All over the internet, there are articles about places where you might want to GenTravel to or some other aspect about GenTraveling! Each Friday I hope to share links to some of those articles. There might be one link, or if my time management skills are stellar that week, and I have time to hunt for more, I’ll link to more than just one. :o)

Here is this week’s:

I know you’ll enjoy reading RestlessJo‘s account of her “Call to Poland” and how her family’s world was ‘turned upside down’ after they received a call from long lost family in Poland who didn’t speak her language, but who welcomed her and her family into their open arms regardless.  I LOVE stories like this! Her father had left Poland 64 years earlier (in German custody). After years and years of no contact, Jo and her father visited their Polish relatives and it sounds like they’ve continued to strengthen those links.  Very cool!

Have a great weekend! Best wishes for finding those ancestors.  Are you planning your GenTraveling yet? Where do you plan to go? Be sure to share your GenTraveling Bucket list on our Bucket List Page.  GenTraveling: It’s the Real Deal Thrill!

GenTraveling in Italy

pastacurtains.jpgHow do you like these pasta curtains? Clever huh? I took this photo last year as we walked through a cute village in Portovenere, Italy.  And speaking of Italy, I recently read a fantastic article about gentraveling in Italy at this website HERE.  You know I’m a sucker for a really good GenTraveling story! The author explains how he was visiting Italy, planning to do some family history.  As he drove into a village, he turned onto a residential street “the width of a shopping cart” and there was a truck blocking the road (which I could totally picture after visiting last year)!  Since he was basically stuck, he got out and yelled to the man unloading the truck, “Excuse me, do you speak English”….

***Please just go read the article because basically the author asks himself “Did I really just drive into the Alps, yell to a guy on the street, and find that we’re related?”!

Author Matt Crossman also gives readers some really good tips about GenTraveling:

Tip 1: There are tons of resources and experts to help you find your relatives

Tip 2: Family stories may be flawed, but you should collect as many as possible

Tip 3: Take your research with you

Tip 4: Be open, trusting, and prepared for the unexpected

Tip 5: Hire a local researcher if you don’t trust your own blind luck

Tip 6: They’re your relatives, and they’re gone. At some point, your heart will break.

Tip 7: You’re related to more people than you realize, so ask and ask and ask

Tip 8: Every answer leads to more questions. It’s a blast.

Again, go read the article for more details on these 8 tips. And I agree!  GenTraveling is A BLAST!  I get so excited to read other people’s experiences.  It’s THE REAL DEAL THRILL!

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So, are you planning your GenTraveling yet? Where do you plan to go? Be sure to share your GenTraveling Bucket list on our Bucket List Page.  GenTraveling: It’s the Real Deal Thrill!

 

 

GenTraveling to the Ukraine

olga

If you want to read a great story of an Arizona family finding their Ukrainian relatives -along with details about their stumbling blocks and their successes along the way, check out Dawn Meyers Dixon’s article in the Jan/Feb 2014 issue of Family Chronicle magazine! The really great thing is how Dawn gentraveled (along with her 80 year old mother) in 2012 to Holovetsk, Ukraine – their ancestral village!

The article mentions one particularly excellent suggestion regarding researching Eastern European families: when posting queries online, try using the Cyrillic alphabet.  Dawn’s Ukrainian relatives were searching for 2 years and had run across a few of her online queries, but apparently they didn’t translate well, so they never followed up on any of them. What great advice. Making it easy for non-English readers to read and understand our queries will increase our chances that those queries will be successful!y replied to.

Dawn had spent decades searching for her Ukrainian family.  What a REAL DEAL THRILL it must have been to finally make those lost connections with her family!

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So, are you planning your GenTraveling yet? Where do you plan to go? Be sure to share your GenTraveling Bucket list on our Bucket List Page.  GenTraveling: It’s the Real Deal Thrill!

{photo source: Author Dawn Meyers Dixon’s mother and her only sister who died young. Jan/Feb 2014 Family Chronicle magazine}

 

 

 

GenTraveling – Friday Finds

fridayfinds

Hello! I have some Fabulous Friday Finds to share with you!

All over the internet, there are articles about places where you might want to GenTravel to or some other aspect about GenTraveling! Each Friday I hope to share links to some of those articles. There might be one link, or if my time management skills are stellar that week, and I have time to hunt for more, I’ll link to more than just one. :o)

Here are this week’s:

Genealogy Vacation: The Next Great Adventure  With a title like that, you KNOW I had to go visit and read this article! It didn’t disappoint! It started out with how a complete stranger called and requested the author’s DNA!  Go take a peek and read of this ‘Great Adventure’!

Quilts, Cemeteries, Snowflakes or Genealogy Fun in Pictures  This article reminded me of some of my own GenTraveling!  Apparently, a quilt show was the original reason to plan this trip, but of course, genealogy research is always a welcome addition to any itinerary!

 

Have a great weekend! Best wishes for finding those ancestors.  Are you planning your GenTraveling yet? Where do you plan to go? Be sure to share your GenTraveling Bucket list on our Bucket List Page.  GenTraveling: It’s the Real Deal Thrill!

GenTraveling – Researching Canadian Jews

jewishimm

Hello GenTravelers!  I’m back and now, after a longer than expected hiatus, I’m excited to continue blogging about GenTraveling.  I recently returned home from a GenTraveling trip of my own, and so I want to continue spreading the excitement, knowledge and thrill of  traveling where ancestors actually lived again with all of you!

Today’s ancestral spotlight is on Jewish research – but specifically Canadian Jews.  I recently read Debra L. Doppelt Karplus’ March/April 2014 article in the Family Chronicle magazine entitled, Canadians Exploring Their Jewish Roots.  Debra explained that since there are approximately 385,000 Jewish people currently living in Canada, it is likely they would need to understanding some idiosyncratic and specific characteristics pertaining to tracking ancestors who migrated to Canada. Debra did a good job of explaining some of those idiosyncrasies, such as Jewish naming practices and where to find immigration records. The holocaust, known to Jews as the “Shoah” resulted in records being gathered and organized to document the people who perished during the Holocaust, which sometimes included birth dates and next of kin!  Debra referenced a key source for these records as the Yad Vashem (yadvashem.org). But ultimately, Debra recommends planning a research trip to visit the ancestral homeland in Canada or Europe and she points out that ‘…it seems that most people have many ethnicities that make them who they are. Genealogists should not be surprised to discover some Jewish ancestors somewhere in their family tree.”

Personally, I’d be ecstatic to find some Jewish ancestors in my tree.  I think I’ll go hunting for some so I’ll have an excuse to dive into some of the records Debra recommended – and then plan a research trip!

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So, are you planning your GenTraveling yet? Where do you plan to go? Be sure to share your GenTraveling Bucket list on our Bucket List Page.  GenTraveling: It’s the Real Deal Thrill!

{photo source in public domain – William James (1866-19480}

GenTraveling – pushin’ the pause button

pause

Hello GenTravelers!

Yeah, I don’t know what I was thinking – starting this new blog site when I did! Yikers! I won’t list the zillion commitments I’ve committed to – but let’s just say, there are about a zillion commitments coming up that I’ve committed to! haha! Life’s good, but really busy. :o)

So, I’m pushin’ the pause button on this site.  I promise I’ll get back to it soon …well, eventually.  GenTraveling is something I’m passionate about, so this site WiLL happen.

Take care and I’ll catch up with you all later in the year. :o)  :o)  :o)