Who is that GenTraveler?

whoisthatgentraveler

Good morning GenTravelers!

I want to introduce you to some fellow GenTravelers – terrific people who regularly and activity plan trips to where their ancestors actually lived. In this new blog series, some of the people you’ll meet will be family historians – others may be professional genealogists who are especially expert in certain regions.  Today, I’d like you to meet…

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Jean-Luc Brebant; who has been doing genealogy for 30 years. He considers himself a “History & Heritage Consultant, Family Roots Searcher, Landmark Finder, Heritage Investigator, Legacy Messenger, History Tracer, Past Hunter, Documents Finder, Archives Collector, Trace Investigator, Places Talker, and Mind-Opener.” (More details about the photo above HERE)

Area of Specialization: France and North America (USA and Canada). All the people with French roots.

How often do you go GenTraveling?

All the time. I go to France twice a year.

Do you have any tips on how to make GenTraveling a success?

Sharing experiences.

What types of repositories are your favorite to visit while GenTraveliing?

Local libraries (besides all the documents online).

Tell us about your favorite GenTraveling excursion.

Tracing my own ancestors in France and finding names on old graves.

Also go {HERE} to Jean-Luc’s instagram feed to read about him finding the location of his grand-grand0father’s bakery in Le Perray-en-Yvelines – Yvelines – Southwest of Paris! The photo on the left is the store in 2018 and the one on the right is the same building in 1918!

Get social and check out Jean-Luc on these platforms:

https://www.revealingthepast.com/

https://www.instagram.com/revealingthepast/

Jean-Luc is currently taking genealogy clients, so if you have French roots and need his assistance, contact him at  revealingthepast2@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Literary GenTraveling

dani

Hello GenTravelers!

How was your week? I’m happy to say that I went Literary GenTraveling this week!  (I’ve mentioned that I feel like I’m traveling when I read a good book, right?)

I recently heard about this new book and downloaded the audiobook right away.  Being a genealogist, I found it extremely interesting – plus Dani Shapiro is an excellent writer. I heard about this book from listening to Gretchen Rubin’s podcast – and she is starting a book club and this book will be the inaugural book! (Go HERE if you want to find out more about Gretchen’s book club).

Congratulations to Dani Shapiro. I enjoyed her memoir very much!

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What Literary GenTraveling have you been on lately?  I’d LOVE some good book recommendations!  I tend to get transported in time with a good book – especially ones with a genealogy element! My hubby will even tell you of a time when I was so engrossed in a book that I didn’t even hear him vacuum our stairs! (And yes, a wife SHOULD notice when her husband goes to such effort! Haha!)

Have a great week!

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So, are you planning your GenTraveling yet? Where do you plan to go? Be sure to share your GenTraveling Bucket list on our Bucket List Page.  GenTraveling: It’s the Real Deal Thrill!

GenTraveling – to conferences!

RT

Hello GenTravelers!

Will you be Gentraveling to a genealogy conference this year?  RootsTech is just over a week away!  Yep, the sea of people in the photo above is what a typical trip to the RootsTech Exhibitor Hall looks like! Crazy huh?

I would highly encourage such GenTraveling!  If you can’t make it to RootsTech, there are plenty of other conferences to consider.  This year,  I plan to attend RootsTech as well as the Federation of Genealogical Societies conference which is being held in Washington DC. this year.  {I’m excited for that!}

Pairing GenTraveling to a conference and a research trip to where an ancestor actually lived is the ultimate win!  Are any of the national conferences this year, anywhere close to where your ancestors lived?  Check out the list below and maybe plan to go!

RootsTech 2019 – February 2 – March 2 in Salt Lake City, Utah

National Genealogical Society conference – May 8-11 in St Charles, Missouri

Southern California Genealogy Jamboree – May 30 – June 2 – in Burbank, California

Federation of Genealogical Societies conference –  August 21-24 – in Washington DC

These are only a few of the major, national conferences; there are plenty of smaller regional or community conferences too.  See what’s happening in the area you want to go GenTraveling to and get busy and plan your trip!

As always, good luck climbing your trees and have a great day!

 

 

GenTraveling – It broadens the mind!

travel

Hello GenTravelers!

I’m sure most of you know that Mark Twain is credited with saying:

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one’s lifetime.”

I agree…do you?

Travel broadens the mind.  Therefore, I would like to modify Twain’s message as follows:

GenTraveling is fatal to shallow research and brick walls, and many family historians need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, in depth, and reasonably exhaustive research of our ancestors and where they actually lived cannot be acquired by vegetating only in online databases and other online resources all one’s lifetime!

Enough said.  Good luck with your preparatory research via all those wonderful online databases!  Then GO plan a GenTraveling excursion!

Have a great week!

 

GenTraveling – Should we travel to unpleasant locations?

andersonville

Hello GenTravelers!

If you’ve traced family members back to the nineteenth century, odds are you have some ancestors who fought in the Civil War. I hope you are planning a trip to where they actually lived.  But what about where they actually died?  Many family historians have ancestors that died in places like Andersonville Prison in Georgia.  Do you have any desire to visit there? Nearly 13,000 prisoners died there. Were any of them your ancestors?

Conditions in the Andersonville Prison were atrocious. Understandably, prisoner Robert H. Kellogg wrote, “Can this be hell?” because scenes like this were common:

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There are many such historic sites that conjure up unpleasant feelings. Do we visit these locations in order to firmly remind ourselves of the horrors that occurred there, and to do all we can to never allow those horrors to be repeated?  I hope so.  Just be sure to plan some other wonderful (and uplifting) locations on the itinerary for that GenTraveling trip as well!

Where have you GenTraveled to, that you would consider ‘unpleasant’?

Good luck for successfully researching your ancestors – and be sure to let me know where you are planning your next GenTraveling adventure!

GenTraveling to Open Air Museums

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Hello GenTravelers!

Isn’t it thrilling to go GenTraveling?!?  To visit your ancestral lands?  Yes, it is the real deal thrill! But some travelers can be discouraged because their ancestor’s former village is now a fast-pace urban area where is it nearly impossible to imagine what it may have been like when their ancestors lived there.

Thank goodness for museums that help bridge that imagination gap! I recently read of the Rhenisch Open Air Museum in Kommern, Germany which includes four villages that help family historians, and others, get a sense of what life used to be like. Their website (link HERE) mentions they have over 65 historical buildings!

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And Kommern isn’t the only city to offer this type of essential GenTraveling experience.  Apparently there are many throughout Europe. You might want to read travel expert, Rick Steve’s article, “Time Traveling at Europe’s Open-Air Museums“.

So, I know you all are planning your next GenTraveling trip, right?  In addition to court houses, libraries and archives, be sure to see if any museums are in the area and add a visit there to your itinerary!

Best wishes for successful research, and be sure to let me know where you plan to GenTravel next!

 

Goals, Goals & GenTraveling

goals

 

Since January 1st, I’ve read some terrific blog posts with some awesomely ambitious genealogical goals for 2019.  I was totally inspired!  (If you too want some inspiration, you can visit   The Genealogy Girl and/or Andersonology , and there are many more – just search them out!) Although it’s January 22nd, there’s still time to make a few new year’s resolutions, right?!?

After reading these inspirational posts, I came up with a very long list myself, but I don’t think I’ll publish it – because that’s a LOT of pressure, haha!  But I’m happy to say that I’ve already crossed off one of my goals:

*Attend a week-long genealogy institute course  {CHECK!}

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Last week I attended SLIG2019.   It was great! And now that goal will probably be a yearly goal from now on! Why?  Because I’m sold on the value of the course. The level of instruction was deep and concentrated (it’s a 5-day/all-day course), and the instructors are all experts in their field. I highly recommend it! The hardest part was deciding which course to sign up for!

To give you a taste of what is typically offered, here is what SLIG offered this year:

Course 1: The Family History Law Library  

Course 2: Beside, Through, and Beyond the Golden Door: Immigrants to the United States After 1890  

Course 3: Metes & Bounds Land Platting  

Regional Research

Course 4: Bridging the Gap: New England to the Midwest, 1780-1840  

Course 5: Researching New York: Resources and Strategies  

Course 6: Advanced Southern Research and Sources  

Ethnic Research

Course 7: 1619-2019: Four Hundred Years of African American Genealogy  

Course 8: Exploring Native American Research  

Countries & Languages

Course 9: Gothic Script and Fraktur: Reading Records of Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Poland, and the Czech Republic, plus German-American Church Books and Newspapers  

DNA

Course 10: Introduction to Genetic Genealogy  

Course 11: A Practical Approach: Establishing Genealogical Proof with DNA  

Methodology

Course 12: Researching Like a Professional  

Course 13: Burned Counties and More: Overcoming Destroyed, Missing or Non-Extant Records; Sources and Techniques/Methods  

Course 14: Advanced Genealogical Methods  

Writing & Summarizing

Course 15: Writing a Quality Family Narrative

 

So that goal is checked off! Yeah!  My other goals are, of course, to travel to various places where my ancestors actually lived.  You can be sure I’ll post about those trips!

How are you doing on your goals? Let me know, because one can’t have too much inspiration! Maybe I’ll add to my list, or get busy on next year’s list already!

Have a great week!